How Much Energy Did Super Bowl LII Use?

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How Much Energy Did Super Bowl LII Use?

What a great game Super Bowl LII was! Whether you were an Eagles or a Patriots fan or were just there to watch the half time show, the Super Bowl truly is an unofficial holiday in America. (That was evident yesterday as many people around the world tuned in to watch the game). With yesterday’s game and past Super Bowl’s festivities make us all remember the memories of past Super Bowl parties and watching the big game with friends and family. These fond memories keep us excited for the big event each year.

 

How Much Energy Does the Super Bowl Use?

If you have ever wondered how much energy the Super Bowl uses, you are not alone. Being a solar company, we at Positive Solar are always thinking about energy costs and savings. And with an event as large as the Super Bowl, it seems like energy use would skyrocket for that five- to six-hour period. From the televisions that play the big game at home to the lights and scoreboards at the venue to the epic halftime show on the field, the Super Bowl clearly takes a lot of energy to run. But how much energy does it really take? Well, you’re in luck because we did some quick research to answer just that!

 

Big Screen TVs around the World 

According to Electric Choice, the Super Bowl is a worldwide event that is broadcasted to 180 countries in 25 different languages. That means people in Mexico, Brazil, Australia, and even South Korea are watching the big game. True, American football isn’t as popular as soccer is around the world, but it still leaves its own impact. So as you were watching the Patriots and the Eagles duel it out in Minnesota on Sunday, other fans across the world were also huddled around their TVs.TV Energy Usage for Super Bowl

But, although the Super Bowl is a worldwide event, people actually use LESS energy while participating in the festivities. Why? Because people gather together and focus their energy on only one energy-consuming device—the big, flat screen television in the living room—rather than on a myriad of other technologies. Clearly that’s not the only place where fans watch the big game, but you will find most people around the world gathered together around one television.

 

Super Bowl Energy Costs

Despite the communal nature of celebrating the Super Bowl, how much will the energy bill actually be? In 2016, Solar Power Authority investigated and found that the NFL does all they can to go green, such as cutting energy costs by using energy-efficient light bulbs. Viewers at home also use less money, for essentially the same reasons.

 

Super Bowl Sunday Used Less Energy than You Think

It’s safe to say that the whole event on Sunday, from the people at home to the festivities in Minnesota, will end up being greener than most think. Think of it like this: everyone dropped what they were doing and focused their electricity use on one thing rather than on other energy-consuming activities by gathering together and watching the big game. And with so many fans participating, in reality only a small portion of them will be taking in the huge spectacle in person, where the NFL and Super Bowl planners are doing their best to keep the production green. Of course, it’s not perfect, but considering other activities that consume more energy than watching your TV, don’t feel bad that you are hurting the environment by joining in on the Super Bowl Sunday festivities.

 

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